1. Background to the Programme

The rapid growth of healthcare systems and the indispensible increasing role of technology in diagnostic, therapeutic, and associated research activities have culminated into increasing demand for skilled biomedical engineers both in Uganda and globally. The proposed Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering (BSc. BE) programme is aimed at advancing the technology needed to enhance healthcare. The Programme combines traditional engineering expertise with an understanding of biological processes. The Biomedical Engineers so trained are expected to work with physicians, therapists, and other technicians in the design, construction, implementation, and maintenance of sophisticated healthcare equipment and lifesaving devices. The Biomedical Engineering Programme shall equip scholars to use cutting-edge engineering principles to analyze and facilitate the biological and medical technology innovations needed to solve healthcare problems and ultimately, improve the healthcare system.
The proposed BSc. BE curriculum emphasizes education in the fundamentals of engineering sciences that form the common basis of all engineering subspecialties. Education with this emphasis is intended to provide students with a solid engineering foundation for a career in which engineering practice may change rapidly. In addition, elements of bioengineering design are incorporated at every level in the curriculum. This is accomplished by integration of laboratory experimentation, computer applications, and exposure to real bioengineering problems throughout the program. The curriculum also provides for students to work as teams in senior design project courses to solve multidisciplinary problems suggested by industrial and clinical experience.
Graduates of the Makerere University BSc. BE shall be responsible for designing, constructing, implementing and maintaining: Artificial Devices that replace or support body functions, such as pacemakers, prosthetic devices, and artificial organs; Therapeutic Products, such as healthcare-related lasers, and systems that perform critical functions such as tissue fusion, insulin delivery, and muscle repair; Sensors for various patient-monitoring devices and bioelectric and telemetry equipment; Medical Imaging Instrumentation such as magnetic resonance and X-ray tools; and Healthcare Information Systems for Patient Rerecords, Drugs and Stock Management, Laboratory Information Systems among others.

2. Justification for the Programme

Uganda as a nation is increasingly importing complex pieces of equipment to support health and health related research. Most of these pieces of equipment arrive without the accompanying care, maintenance and support. In some cases, the equipment specifications are not suited to the local environment, which affects durability and use of this equipment. The graduates of this program will use their knowledge to reduce the costs of maintenance, wastage, loss of work hours from equipment downtime and other resources due to the current lack of this cadre of trainees on the market. In addition, these graduates will be in position to advice on sourcing, procurement and preventive maintenance correctly specified for our environment thus making further savings to the country.
The graduates of this program will have an in depth understanding of the subject thus create an easy to train group of resource persons. This trainability makes the biomedical engineers an easy group to retool especially with the purchase of new pieces of equipment. This is important given the rapid changes seen in the field of biomedical engineering and the need to keep up with global technology trends. The graduates of this program will benefit from the short stint training support given with most new pieces of equipment. Later they can use the new knowledge they have acquired to develop more in depth training for other less qualified support staffs.
Given the uniqueness of the environment and people in Africa, there is a need to design biomedical equipment that is suited to both. The graduates of this program will participate in research, innovation and design of new devices suited to and in response for the local need of healthcare in low resource settings. The curriculum has different tracks for specialization to enable the graduates to focus on key domains in the biomedical engineering discipline at an early stage. These and other innovations in the program will help grow the discipline and the institutional regional capacity to do basic science research.

3. Objectives and Educational Outcomes

The programme objective is to prepare students for careers in the biomedical industry or for further education in graduate school. The students may go on to design devices to diagnose and treat disease, engineer tissues to repair wounds, develop cutting-edge genetic treatments, or create computer programs to understand how the human body works. The BSc. BE is so designed to produce entrepreneurship-oriented graduates who are capable of propping up new companies, out of the prototypes that they will have developed at the undergraduate level.

Educational Objectives

The educational objectives of this programme are to:

  • Produce graduates who are able to practice biomedical engineering to serve Uganda and the regional industries, government agencies, or national and international industries.
  • Produce graduates with the necessary background and technical skills to work professionally in one or more of the following areas: medical imaging, health informatics, biomechanics, biomaterial/tissue engineering and medical instrumentation.
  • Prepare graduates for personal and professional success with awareness and commitment to their ethical and social responsibilities, both as individuals and in team environments.
  • Prepare graduates who are capable of entering and succeeding in an advanced degree program in a field such as engineering, science, or business.
Program Outcomes

Knowledge

  • The graduates should be able to apply fundamental knowledge of engineering and biomedical sciences in daily practice.
  • The graduates will possess a broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal/cultural context.

Skills

  • The graduates will show proficiency in the design and conduct biomedical experiments quantitatively analyze, interpret data to solve problems associated with interaction between living and non-living materials and systems.
  • The graduates will show expertise in designing systems, components, or processes to tackle biomedical engineering problems within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health, safety, regulation, manufacturability and sustainability.
  • The graduates will apply the phases of design (need identification, problem definition, synthesis analysis, optimization, evaluation, and presentation) in order to propose a feasible solution to a variety of biomedical problems.
  • The graduates will apply information and communication technologies (ICT) for the advancement of biomedical engineering
  • The graduates will be skilled in the recognition of the need for, and have the ability to engage in continuous professional development on contemporary issues related to biomedical engineering.
  • The graduates will be competent in leadership, management, Entrepreneurship, and ethical practice skills to work under minimal supervision

Attitudes
On completion of the program the graduates will,

  • Be able to function in multi-disciplinary teams.
  • Have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility required of all engineering, and the unique ethical responsibilities of engineers working in health-related fields.
  • Communicate effectively/scientifically both orally and in writing on technical issues related to biomedical engineering
  • Demonstrate the ability to use and adapt to local settings the knowledge generated by biomedical science research

4. TARGET GROUP

The target group for this programme will bethe annual outputs of Advanced Level Certificate Education, or its equivalent, and those individuals in the working sector possessing appropriate entry requirement, who desire to acquire further training at Degree level.

5. Regulations for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering

Studies and examinations for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering – B.Sc. (BE) shall be governed by the general regulations and statutes of Makerere University and in addition by the regulations of the College of Health Sciences:

5.1 Admission to First Year

Admission into the first year is through any of the three avenues, the Direct Entry Scheme, the Mature Age Scheme and the Diploma Holders Scheme.

5.2 The Direct Entry Scheme

An applicant must have obtained two advanced level passes, one in Mathematics and one in Physics, at the same sitting of the Uganda Advanced Certificate of Education or its equivalent. For purposes of computing entry points, the advanced level subjects shall carry the following weights:

  • Weight 3 - Mathematics, Physics, Biology, Zoology
  • Weight 2 - Best of Economics, Chemistry, or Technical Drawing
  • Weight 1 - General Paper
  • Weight 0.5 - Any other subject.

5.3 The Mature Age Entry Scheme

Admission may also be via the Mature Age Entry Scheme, after the passing of two special mature age University Examinations, one in aptitude and the other in specialised knowledge.

5.4 Diploma Holders Entry Scheme

Holders of the Uganda National Examinations Board Ordinary Technical Diploma or its equivalent can be admitted to the programme. Applicants should have obtained a Credit Class diploma with at least a Credit Pass in Mathematics. Other eligible credit class diplomas with at least a credit pass in Mathematics include

  • Radiographers
  • Anaesthetic Assistants
  • Medical Laboratory Technologists
  • Clinical Officers
  • Dispensers
  • Mechanical, Biomedical or Electrical Engineering Diplomas

5.5 Admission to other Years

Admission other than to the first year of the programme shall require a special resolution of the College Board and permission of the Senate. The Departments will work out all appropriate Credit transfers, which shall not exceed 40% of the minimum degree Credit Units. Persons holding Higher National Diploma from a recognised Institution can be admitted to 2nd year, with the provisions that they will be required to take some courses from the 1st year that both the College Board will have identified and deemed mandatory.

6. CONDUCT OF THE PROGRAMME

6.1 Type of Programme

This programme shall be conducted through Course-work and Examinations. There shall be two types of Programmes, namely, Day Programme (DAY) and afternoon Programme (AFTERNOON).

6.2 Programme Duration

The minimum duration for this programme shall be four (4) years. The course is designated to be taken over a minimum period of eight semesters. The duration of a Semester is seventeen (17) weeks. There shall be university examinations to be conducted in the last two weeks of each semester.

6.3 Course Credits

The programme shall be conducted on credit unit (CU) basis. One credit unit shall be equivalent to one contact hour (CH) per week per semester, or a series of 15 contact hours.
One Contact hour is equivalent to one hour of lectures (LH) or two hours of practical work (PH) or five hours of fieldwork/industrial training (FH).
No course shall carry less than one credit unit.

6.4 Type of Courses

The Course content to be covered in this Programme shall be based on the Curriculum approved by the Makerere University Senate. The method of teaching and examination will adhere to the Senate approved syllabi. This programme shall be composed of a set of prescribed Courses that shall be registered for by every student in order for him or her to qualify for the award of the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering. Courses in the programme shall be classified as follows:

  • A core course is one which must be registered for and passed by a student in order to obtain a degree.
  • An elective course is one which may be taken to make up the minimum requirements of the degree.
  • An audited course is one which a student attends but is not examined in it.
  • A pre-requisite course is one which must be taken and passed before a related higher level course.

6.5 Course Assessment

(a) Each course shall be assessed on the basis of 100 total marks with proportions as follows:
• Course Work 40%
• Written Examination 60%
(b) Course work shall consist of laboratory work and progressive assessment (assignments/tests) each component assessed at 20%.
(c) For a course without laboratory work, progressive assessment shall carry 40%.
(d) A minimum of two coursework assignments/tests shall be required per Course.

6.6.1 Normal Semester Course Load

The minimum number of Credit Units per Semester shall be fifteen (15). The maximum number of Credit Units per Semester shall be twenty one (21).

6.6.2 Maximum Semester Course Load
The maximum number of Credit Units per Semester shall be twenty eight (28) to cater for students who have courses to retake or those who are able to complete the requirements for their respective Academic Awards in less than the stipulated minimum duration.

6.7 Board of Examiners

  • There shall be a school Board of examiners, composed of external and internal examiners appointed by Senate on the recommendation of the College of Health Sciences Board and chaired by the Dean of the school of Biomedical Sciences.
  • The Board of Examiners shall receive, consider and recommend to the School Board the examination results of each candidate.
  • The School Board shall recommend the results of examinations to the College Board for consideration and approval.
  • In an emergency, the Dean may act on behalf of the School Board or the Board of Examiners but must report the action taken to the next Meeting of these Boards. In so doing the Dean shall, however, act in consultation with the relevant head of Department.

6.8 Grading Of Courses

Each course shall be graded out of a maximum of 100 marks and assigned appropriate letter grades and grade point average as follows:
Table 1: Course Grade Criteria
Marks % Letter Grade Grade Point
90.0 – 100.0 A+ 5.0
80.0 - 89.9 A 5.0
75.0 - 79.9 B+ 4.5
70.0 -74.9 B 4.0
65.0 - 69.9 C+ 3.5
60.0 - 64.9 C 3.0
55.0 - 59.9 D+ 2.5
50.0 – 54.9 D 2.0
45.0 - 49.9 E+ 1.5
40.0 - 44.9 E- 1.0
Below 40.0 F 0.0

6.9 Progression

Progression of a student shall be classified as Normal, Probationary or Discontinuation.
6.9.1 Normal Progress
Normal Progress shall occur when a student has passed all the specified Courses. This occurs when a student passes each course taken with a minimum grade point (GP) of 2.0.
6.9.2 Probationary Progress
This is a warning stage and it will occur if:
• A student fails the Core or Compulsory Course.
• A student obtains the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of less than two (2) at the end of any semester.
• When the Grade Point Average of a student goes up in the following semester after the student has retaken and passed the failed Courses, then the probation shall be removed.

6.9.3 Discontinuation.

(a) When a student accumulates three consecutive probations based on CGPA he/she shall be discontinued;
(b) A student who has failed to obtain at least the Pass Mark (50%) during the Third Assessment in the same Course or Courses he/she had retaken shall be discontinued from his/her studies at the University;
(c) A student who has overstayed in an Academic Programme by more than Two (2) Years shall be discontinued from his/her studies at the University.

(a) A student shall retake a Course when next offered again in order to obtain at least the Pass Mark (50%) if he/she had failed during the First Assessment in the Course or Courses.
(b) A student who has failed to obtain at least the Pass Mark (50%) during the Second Assessment in the same Course he/she has retaken shall receive a warning.
(c) A student may retake a Course when next offered again in order to improve his/her Pass Grade(s) got at the first Assessment in the Course were low.
(d) While retaking a Course or Courses, a student shall:
(i) Attend all the prescribed lectures/tutorials/Practicals/Fieldwork in the Course;
(ii) Satisfy all the requirements for the Coursework Component in the Course; and
(iii) Sit for the University Examinations in the Course.
(e) A student shall not be allowed to accumulate more than five (5) Retake Courses at a time.
(f) A final year student whose final Examination Results have already been classified by the relevant College/Faculty/School/Institute Board and has qualified for the Award of a degree/Diploma/Certificate, shall not be permitted to retake any Course.
(g) When a student has retaken a course, the better of the two Grades he/she obtained in that Course shall be used in the computation of his/her Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA).
(h) Whenever a Course has been retaken, the Academic Transcript shall indicate so accordingly.
A student who does not wish to retake a failed Elective Course shall be allowed to take a substitute Elective.

(a) If the Board of the school of Biomedical Sciences found out that a student has no justifiable reason for having been absent from a Particular examination, such a student shall receive a fail (F) Grade for the Course(s) he/she had not sat the examination in. The Course(s) in which the Fail (F) Grade was/were awarded shall also account in the calculation of the CGPA.
(b) If the Board of the School of Biomedical Sciences is satisfied that a student was absent from a final examination due to justifiable reason(s) such as sickness or loss of a parent/guardian, and then a Course Grade of ABS shall be assigned to that Course(s). The student shall be permitted to retake the final examination when the Course would be next offered or at the next examination season, if the Lecturer concerned can make the appropriate arrangements for the examination.

A student shall be responsible for keeping a record of her/his practical experience in a log record book, which should be duly signed by the student, practical supervisor and course lecturer; for presentation to the Head of Department, before a certificate of due performance can be issued. Attendance of classroom, clinical, labwork and fieldwork shall constitute 20% of the Progressive (ITPA) mark.
A candidate will be denied a Certificate of Due Performance in any course, if attendance and performance in class, clinical and practical's are deemed unsatisfactory or when student who does not have coursework marks and will not be allowed to sit the University Examinations.

6.13 Withdrawal

A student can apply to the Board of the School of Biomedical Sciences for permission to withdraw from studies at any time of the semester.
A student will be allowed only a maximum of two withdrawals in an Academic Programme and each withdrawal shall be a maximum of one academic year only.

6.14 Approval 0f Examination Results

Approval of all examination results will be by the Board of the School of Biomedical Sciences, but the results shall not be regarded as final until they are confirmed by Senate on submission of Appropriate Pass Lists to Senate.

6.15 Publication of Examination Results

The relevant faculty shall publish Provisional Examination Results of candidates in every examination soon after the meeting of the departmental Examinations Committee. The Examination Results shall be arranged and published in a manner as prescribed by the Senate.

6.16 Appeals

Any student or candidate aggrieved by a decision of the Board of the school of Biomedical Sciences may appeal to the Senate Examinations Committee for reversal or moderation of the decision of the Board.

6.17 Change Of Course

A student may be permitted to change course(s) in an Academic Programme in order to substitute the Course(s) failed. The substitute Course(s) should be within the specified Course(s) for that Academic Programme.

6.18 Change of Academic Programme

      • A student may be permitted to change from one Academic Programme to another on condition that:

(i) He/She had satisfied the admission requirements for the Academic Programme applied for;
(ii) He/She should not have been attending lectures/tutorials and other academic activities of the Academic Programme he/she would want to change from for more than one-half of the duration of the Programme;
(iii) He/She had not been previously dismissed on disciplinary grounds from the University.

  • A student permitted to change his/her Programme may be allowed to transfer the Credits from the previous Academic Programme to the new Academic Programme, provided that the Credits being transferred are relevant to the new Academic Programme.

6.19 Payment of Fees

(a) Privately-sponsored students are required to pay registration fees within the first three (30 weeks at the beginning of an academic year in order for him/her to be registered and issued with the University Identity Card.
(b) A privately-sponsored student who fails to pay the registration fee at the end of the third week of the beginning of an academic year shall forfeit his/her place in the University in case the student is in the first year or be deregistered in the case of a continuing student.
(c) Tuition and other University fees are due on the first day of the academic year. Privately-sponsored students who can not pay full fees at the beginning of the academic year are required to pay at least 40% of the fees by the end of the sixth week of a semester and to complete payment of all tuition fees by the end of the twelfth week of a semester.
(d) A privately-sponsored student who shall not have paid at least 40% of the fees by the end of the sixth week shall be de-registered.
(e) A privately-sponsored student who shall not have completed paying fees by the end of the twelfth week will not be allowed to sit for University examinations.

6.20 Refund of Tuition Fees When a Student Has Withdrawn From Studies

A student who has been permitted to withdraw from studies shall be refunded the Tuition Fees already paid according to the following schedules:
The time at which a Student Percentage of the Tuition Fees already
has withdrawn in a Semester paid to be refunded to the Student
(a) By the end of the First week of a Semester 100%
(b) By the end of the Second week of a Semester 80%
(c) By the end of the Third week of a Semester 60%
(d) By the end of the Fourth week of a Semester 40%
(e) By the end of the Fifth week of a Semester 20%
(f) After the fifth week 0%
Fees for Residence, Application, Faculty requirements, registration, Examinations, Identity Cards and the Guild charges are not refunded.
In case an Academic Programme to which a student has been admitted is not conducted in a particular academic year, the University will refund the full tuition fees paid by the student.

6.21 Other Specific Examinations Regulations

Subject to General University Examinations Regulations, there are other specific regulations pertaining to this programme, details of which can be sought from the Faculty of Technology or Office of the Academic Registrar.
The following additional letters shall be used, where appropriate:
• W - Withdrawal from Course
• I - Incomplete
• AUD - Audited Course Only

  • CP - Conceded Pass

• The Course Pass Grade Point is 2.0
• No Credit Unit shall be awarded for any Course in which a student fails.

7. REQUIREMENTS FOR AWARD OF THE BSc. DEGREE IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

7.1 Graduation Requirements

The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering shall be awarded to a Candidate who obtains a minimum of 158 credit units, gained from 43 Courses. Of these, 34 shall be core courses and 4 shall be electives as indicated in Table 1.


Table 1: Requirements for Graduation
Year Core Courses Electives Courses
ONE 13 0
TWO 11 0
THREE 8 2
FOUR 6 3
Total Courses 38 5
The minimum requirements for graduation is 158 Credit Units

7.2 Classification of a Degree

The degrees obtained in the school of Biomedical Sciences shall be classified according to the CGPA as follows:-
CLASS CGPA
First 4.40 - 5.0
Second, Upper Division 3.60 - 4.39
Second Lower Division Pass 2.80 - 3.59
Pass 2.0 - 2.79

8. PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The B.Sc. (BE) Programme shall have the following structure:


YEAR

SEMESTER

COURSE CODE

COURSE NAME

Lecture Hours
(LH)
Practical Hours
(PH)
Tutorial Hours
(TH)
Contact Hours (CH) Credit Units (CU)

ONE

ONE

 

All Core Courses

         
   

EMT1101

Engineering Mathematics I

45 00 30 60 4
   

CMP1103

Information and Communications Technology

30 60 00 60 4
   

TEC1101

Communication Skills

30 00 30 45 3
   

BBE1101

Biomedical Engineering Profession

45 00 00 45 3
   

BBE1102

Cell Biology

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE1103

Biochemistry

45 30 00 60 4 22
 

TWO

 

All Core Courses

         
   

EMT1201

Engineering Mathematics II

45 00 30 60 4
   

BBE1201

Analytical Chemistry

45 30 00 60 4
   

ELE1201

Circuit Analysis

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE1203

Mechanics

45 00 30 60 3
   

BBE1204

Genetics and Embryology

30 00 00 30 2
   

BBE1205

Nervous and Endocrine Systems

45 30 30 75 4 21
 

RECESS

TEC1301

Workshop Practice(Core Course)

00 300 00 30 2 2

TWO

ONE

 

All Core Courses

         
   

EMT2101

Engineering Mathematics III

45 00 30 60 4
   

BBE2102

Electronic Devices and Circuits

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE2103

Digestion Metabolism and Excretion

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE2104

Cardio Respiratory Blood and Body Fluids

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE2105

Thermodynamics

45 00 30 60 4 20
 

TWO

 

All Core Courses

         
   

BBE2201

Neurolocomotor

45 30 30 75 4
   

BBE2202

Biomedical equipment

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE2203

Foundations of Behaviour Science

45 00 00 45 3
   

BBE2204

Applied Probability and Statistics

45 00 30 60 4
   

BBE2205

Computer Programming Fundamentals

45 30 00 60 4 19
 

RECESS

BBE2301

Biomedical Engineering Internship I (Core Course)

00 300 00 30 2 2

THREE

ONE

 

All Core Courses

         
   

BBE3101

Biomedical Engineering Design I

15 60 00 45 3
   

BBE3102

Clinical Chemistry

45 30 00 60 4
   

ELE3102

Electromagnetic fields

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE3104

Instrumentation and Control System Engineering

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE3105

Software Engineering

45 00 30 60 4 19
 

TWO

 

Core Courses

         
   

BBE3201

Biomedical Engineering Design II

15 30 00 45 3
   

BBE3202

Clinical Engineering

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE3203

Bioinstrumentation

45 30 00 60 4
     

Elective Courses (At Least two)

         
   

CMP3104

Computer Based Medical Systems

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE3205

Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE3206

Database Systems

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE3207

Biomedical Modeling and Simulation

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE3208

Biomedical Optics

45 30 00 60 4
   

BBE3209

Principals of Accounts

45 00 30 60 4 19
 

RECESS

BBE3301

Biomedical Engineering Internship II (Core Course)

00 300 00 0 2 2

FOUR

ONE

 

Core Courses

         
   

TEC4101

Research Methods

45 00 30 60 4
   

TEC4102

Principles of Management

45 00 00 45 3
   

BBE4101

Signal Processing and Analysis

45 30 00 60 4
     

Elective Courses (At Least Two)

         
   

BBE4102

Intelligent Systems

45 00 00 45 3
   

BBE4103

Embedded Systems Engineering

45 00 00 45 3
   

BBE4104

Computer Networks

30 30 00 45 3
   

BBE4105

Human Factor Engineering

45 00 00 45 3
   

BBE4106

Engineering Law

45 00 00 45 3 17
 

TWO

 

Core Courses

         
   

TEC4201

Entrepreneurship

60 00 00 60 4
   

BBE4201

Research Project

00 120 30 60 4
   

BBE4202

Nuclear and Radiological Equipment

45 30 00 60 4
     

Elective Courses (At Least One)

         
   

BBE4203

Project Management

45 00 00 45 3
   

BBE4204

Pattern Recognition

30 30 00 45 3
   

BBE4205

Tissue Engineering

30 30 00 45 3
   

BBE4205

Medical Imaging Systems

30 30 00 45 3
   

BE4206

Environmental Engineering

45 00 00 45 3

TOTAL

         

158

RESOURCES
ANNEX II COSTING
PROGRAMME COSTING BSC (Biomedical ENGINEERING)

  • SUMMARY

EXPECTED INCOME
I Tuition Fees
Total Admission Number 50
Number of Government-sponsored Students under DAY Programme 35
Number of Government-sponsored Students under DAY Programme 10
Number of Privately-sponsored Students under Afternoon Programme 05
Total Number of Privately-sponsored Students under both Programmes 50
Number of semesters 2
Amount Payable per Privately-sponsored Student per semester 1,500,000/=
Total Amount per Semester 75,000,000/=
Total Amount per Year 150,000,00 /=
II DISTRIBUTION
Faculty (35%) 52,500,000/=
Central Activities (65%) 97,500,000/=
Total 150,000,000/=


B DETAILS OF PROGRAMME COSTING
INCOME
Faculty allocation 52,500,000/=
EXPENDITURE
I Teaching Expenses
Lecture/tutorials/practical hours @50,000 x 1200 CH ............ /=
II Administrative Activities
Faculty Activities (Administration/Cleaning, Furniture, etc.) ............../=
III Teaching Materials

 

ANNEX I: RESOURCES

Personnel

No.

Name

Highest Quali-fication

Position

Dept./ Faculty

Specialisation

1

S. S. Tickodri-Togboa

PhD

Prof.

Full-Time

Computer Engineering, Engineering Mathematics,

2

M. K Musaazi

PhD

Senior. Lecturer

Full-time

Electrical Engineering, Engineering Mathematics

3

JB Kirabira

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full-Time

Mechanical Engineering

4

MAE Okure

PhD

Assoc Prof

Full-time

Mechanical Engineering

5

Adam Sebbit

PhD

Senior Lecturer

Full-Time

Mechanical Engineering, Energy Engineering,

6

Ms. D. Okello

PhD,

Lecturer

Full-Time

Telecommunications Engineering

8

L.L. Kaluuba

MSc

Senior Lecturer

Full-Time

Electrical and Telecommunications Engineering

9

D. Nsubuga Mubiru

MSc

Lecturer

Full-Time

Telecommunications and Electronics

10

PI Musasizi

M.Sc.

Lecturer

Full-Time

Computer Systems Engineering

16

P. Lating-Okidi

M.Sc.

Lecturer

Part- Time

Mechanical Engineering and ICT

18

SK Mwanje

MSc

Assistant Lecturer

Full-Time

Telecommunications and Electrical Engineering

19

IGK Munabi

Msc

Assitant lecturer

Full time

Human anatomy

20

ES Mwaka

PhD

Senior lecturer

Full time

Human anatomy

21

CB Ibingira

MMed

Senior lecturer

Full time

Human anatomy

22

J Kasolo

Msc

Senior lecturer

Full time

Physiology

23

P Waako

PhD

Senior lecturer

Full time

Pharmacology

24

J Ochieng

Msc

Lecturer

Full time

Human anatomy

25

R Lukande

MMed

Lecturer

Full time

Human pathology

26

S Luboga

PhD

Associate Prof

Full time

Human Anatomy

27

R Baingana

Msc

Senior lecturer

Full time

Biochemistry

28

         

B. Equipment and Facilities

Physical facilities:
The program will use the facilities that exist within the school of biomedical sciences and the faculty of technology.

  • The Anatomy lecture theatre for lectures,
  • The Histology laboratory for practical demonstrations, and lectures.
  • The Anatomy dissections room for prosections demonstrations,
  • The physiology laboratories for practical physiology
  • Davis lecture theatre for lectures on some occasions
  • Anatomy seminar room
  • Histology preparation laboratory
  • The biochemistry laboratory
  • There is adequate furniture in the department of human anatomy
  • Mechanical and electrical engineering workshops
  • Animal house for experiments
  • Mulago hospital engineering department
  • in the long term a biomedical engineering laboratory is planned in the school of biomedical sciences

Specimens and teaching material:
The department of anatomy has cadavers, microscopic slides.
Equipment:
The department of human anatomy has microscopes, dissection kits, and computers. There is equipment in the biomedical science departments of physiology, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, pharmacy, physiotherapy, surgery medicine radiology and a computer lab with recommended software for teaching biomedical engineers in the faculty of technology. The following equipment and facilities are available and will be provided by the Faculty:

  • Telecommunications and Electronics Labs,
  • ICT labs for undergraduates and graduates (with a total of over 150 computers connected to the internet through Fibre-Optics network system (backbone) and hence ensuring faculty-wide Internet connectivity).
  • Text books, Transport facilities for field visits and Industrial training, Faculty library,
  • Lecture rooms.
  • N.B.: Owing to the characteristically hands-on-nature of the Programme, students will be very much encouraged to acquire personal lap-top computers. Furthermore, because of the high rate of turn-out of literature in this area and the rather long time the process of acquiring literature through the University Library Book-bank system often takes, students will be advised to adopt intensive usage of internet resources. Occasionally this will require them to purchase some of the most current publications that will emerge during their Course as additional text-books.

How to Apply
Application forms are available at 5th floor Senate building or online from the website for the School of Graduates Studies

Preamble

Biomedical science is the application of biology-based sciences for medical use. Studies in biomedical sciences will bring out the application of biological sciences such  as  physiology,   anatomy, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology , biochemistry and others  to build up knowledge, skills and competences to build on to diagnose,  manage  and prevent diseases.  Other aspects covered include application in health monitoring, product development, biomedical research and innovation, medical education in the various health professional training institutions and regulation of medical and pharmaceutical practice.

Medicine and healthcare have over the past decade became increasingly sophisticated, demanding cross cutting knowledge and skills for effective delivery. The demands of the health sector have also expanded tremendously well beyond the traditional health professionals like the doctors, nurses, and pharmacists because of the ever increasing specialisation. These traditional cadres because of the competing demands can no longer address all aspects  of biomedical research, and training  To address this challenge, the School of Biomedical Sciences at the college of health sciences proposes to start a three-year bachelor of biomedical sciences program.  The program is expected to produce knowledgeable and skilled bio-medical scientists who will take part in various aspects of biomedical science, including   health professional training and medical education, health care delivery and biomedical basic science research. In addition, while the training of Doctors and dental surgeons take 5 years , the first 3 years are spent  mastering the basic biomedical sciences, constituting the first block which are prerequisite ,after which  they continue to clinical medicine clerkships to qualify, This proposed program is an innovation, such that after the first 3 years these students can graduate with bachelor of biomedical sciences, after which they can continue on the different tracks of post graduate education. That may include enrolment on the various biomedical science masters programs, masters in public health, clinical epidymiology, management, and  seeking employment as teachers or tutors in the various health professional, training institutions, or working with research institutions, industries, health sector, self employment, and in addition, pursuing further training in medicine to become doctors, nurses ,and dental surgeons.

Justification

Uganda is experiencing a very  rapid population growth, which  for a long time has  not been matched with sufficient health care delivery, up to date the doctor patient ratio is above 1:12,000, this indicator is even worse for other graduate health professionals such as nurses, dental surgeons to mention a few, as such Uganda and the region has continued to experience a human resource crisis in the health sector ..
The training of these health professionals requires well trained, adequate biomedical  science teachers who are very endangered since, its increasingly difficult to attract medical doctors to these areas when there are more juicy options in other medical disciplines, this has made all the basic sciences graduate programmes very reddudant,attracting less than 3 students a year if lucky and yet not the top grades,
Further more, the training of  Doctors in Uganda, by private institutions is almost impossible because of what it  costs to establish basic science laboratories and facilities for the training doctors and other health professionals in the first 3 years , leave alone the scarcity of the basic science teachers who are being shared among the few medical schools that are coming up,
At the College of  Health  Sciences, we are blessed with these laboratory  facilities, experise,resources and Teachers , and can take advantage of this to train biomedical scientists, in the core biomedical  sciences and after graduation, they can  be admitted to start on the clinical years of medicine, and dentistry like is done in the western world, even institutions with no basic science facilities, but with only teaching hospitals, can now be able to train doctors picking from this pool of graduates. And through this track, the country  and the region can be able to train enough doctors to match the population needs, and gradually improve the doctor patient ratio .

After graduating, Those who don’t aspire for medicine, can take on  the masters track in any of the basic science option of their choice such as microbiology,, and by so doing all the basic science masters programs can have pool to admit from, and these will boost the biomedical  science teachers in the region, some of who will continue as researchers, teachers  tutors and can join other health disciplines like public health,epidymiology,bioinformatics research ethics and management in  biomedical industries. There is also an  increase in number of health professional training institutions, who could for the first time recruit these biomedical scientists.
The biomedical research sector has grown tremendous needing this cadre of expertise for  employment.

These trends demand the presences of biomedical scientists to provide the required human resource that will accelerate the growth of these sectors. It should be noted that most of these sectors are relying on the limited numbers  Doctors for their functioning worsening the human resources crisis in the health sector.
This program will help to alleviate this problem by providing biomedical scientists who have the desired expertise to fill the Human resource gaps that compete for medical doctors  in health care delivery. 

This program also offers an alternative track for students to obtain qualifications in various areas of interest within biomedical and other health related sciences.  This is consistent with the current government policy on the promotion of and increasing student intake in science subjects at all educational levels.

Program goal

To build capacity for enhancement of excellence in health care delivery, biomedical research ,Biomedical training, and acceleration of the training of medical doctors and dentists, and Improved  medical education in all tertially health training institutions, both public and private in Uganda  and the region  at large.                                                                                                                                             

Specific program objectives

1. To produce biomedical scientists with sufficient competencies to enrol on clinical medicine, and other health professional programs, as a postgraduate program.

2. To train biomedical science graduates with knowledge and skills to support health care  delivery in any community in Uganda and the region.
3. To equip graduates with knowledge and skills for safe and scientific biomedical practices.
4.  To produce biomedical science graduates with sufficient Knowledge skills,  and ethical conduct  to work as part of a team in health care delivery.  

5. To produce biomedical science graduates with the necessary entrepreneurial and managerial skills to support biomedical industries in the country

6. To produce biomedical scientists with sufficient competencies to conduct biomedical  research

7. To produce biomedical scientists with sufficient competencies to undertake graduate training in the same specialities to become teachers in biomedical sciences in the various tertiary health  professional   training  institutions in the region.

Curriculum Competencies

In order to achieve these objectives emphasis has been put not only on science subjects but also the behavioural sciences, management, and communication, humanities and social sciences applied to medicine.  It is expected that this will emphasise to the students that the university is a place of learning rather than teaching.  Integrated learning will be done as much as possible to emphasise the following areas in which the biomedical science graduate should be competent:

  • Modern biomedical techniques
  • Medical research and diagnostic procedures
  • Health promotion and prevention of disease
  • Scientific research methods
  • Management, administration and entrepreneurial skills
  • Teaching and learning
  • Community leadership
  • Biomedical ethics

Curriculum characteristics
This  program is made up of short courses that run for 2 to 5 weeks. The courses are sequenced in such a way that one builds on the knowledge of the previous course.

Integration

The medical discipline is characterized by a high level of specialization with a number of well developed specialties. Human function however works as an integral unit. This curriculum integrates the learning experiences both horizontally and vertically. Horizontal integration breaks down the boundaries between disciplines like: Anatomy, Physiology, and Biochemistry that other wise would be taught independently but concurrently to provide a package of learning experiences of the Biomedical Sciences. This does away with the compartmentalization and eliminates repetition of subject content.  Vertical integration ensures that all levels of the learning spiral are integrated, thus students are exposed to Basic Sciences, Clinical experiences and community health activities right from first year.

Problem based approach to learning

This curriculum provides a mix of tutorials, self directed learning sessions, laboratory sessions, seminars, clinical exposure, Clinical clerkship, over view lecturers,   and community based education activities. Small group tutorials guided by real life problems will be the predominant mode of delivery. Students in groups of 5-7 under the guidance of a tutor will explore the problem before them and determine their learning objectives. The learning objectives will then be used as a guide in the self-directed learning sessions. Students will have a report back session during which a tutor will test the competences developed out of the problem. This approach to learning is known to encourage active student learning, critical and analytical thinking, problem solving and promotes life long learning skills. It however requires investment into learning facilities namely; library, computer laboratory and skills training laboratory which shall be put in place by the launch of the program and will be progressively developed.

Community based education activities

Students will randomly distributed to rural health facilities where they will be involved in the community health program of the facility. In the guidance of a site tutor students will support health delivery at the facility and all activities their activities will be recorded and presented for progressive assessment.  This will help the students acquaint themselves with the settings in which they will be practicing after qualification.

Regulations
The program shall be governed by the general regulations of the university and the  regulations of the College of health Sciences.

Admission Requirements

Direct Entry Scheme
For admission to the Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences (BBS) Degree programme under the Direct Entry Scheme, a candidate must have:

  • Uganda Certificate of Education Examinations (or its equivalent)
  • Uganda Advanced Certificate of Education (or equivalent) with two advanced level principal passes in any two of the following subjects: Biology, Chemistry, Food and Nutrition and Physics taken at the same sitting.
  • Other relevant subjects are Agriculture; Mathematics.

 

All candidates for this program should obtain minimum-weighed points as shall be determined by the Admissions Board 

 Mature Age Entry Scheme
For admissions to the BBS. Degree programme under the Mature Age Entry Scheme, a candidate must sit and pass the Mature Age Entrance Examinations set and marked by Makerere University.  He/she must satisfy all other university requirements for the admission to the university as laid down under the Mature Age Entry Scheme guidelines.

Diploma Holders Entry Scheme
For admissions into the BBSc. Programme under the Diploma Holders Entry Scheme a candidate must have the following:-

  • A good second class diploma or certificate in health disciplines
  • A’Level certificate in related subjects

Such diplomas may include;
Medical Laboratory Technologists
Radiographers
Anaesthetic Assistants/Officers
Clinical Officers
Clinical Ophthalmic officers
Physiotherapists
Environmental Health Officers
Public Health Officers
Public Health Dental Assistants
Public Health Assistants
Dispensers
Psychiatric Clinical Officers
Holders of a diploma in health education

And
Uganda Registered Nurses (with A-level certificate)
Uganda Registered Midwives (with A-level certificate)

Assessment and Examinations
At the end of each semester, students will require to sit and pass examinations in those courses that have been offered.  During the semester the student will do progressive tests  which will account for 30% of the final exam mark.
The courses will be assessed in two parts:

  • Progressive assessment contributes not more than 40% of the total marks.
  • End of semester examinations will consist of a written and oral examinations contributing not more than 60% of the total marks.

Each course shall be graded out of a maximum of one hundred (100) marks and assigned appropriate letter grades and grade points as follows.

 

Marks % Point

Letter Grade

Grade Point

80 – 100

A

5

75 - 79.9

B+

4.5

70 - 74.9

B

4

65 - 69.9

B-

3.5

60 - 64.9

C+

3

55 - 59.9

C

2.5

50 - 54.9

C-

2

45 - 49.9

D+

1.5

40 - 44.9

D

1

35 - 39.0

D-

0.5

Below 35

E

0

A student who fails a course should be put on probationary progress.  A student is regarded to progress normally if the progressive assessment and end of semester examination results adds up to CGPA of 2.0

Student Progress
Progression of a student shall be classified as Normal, Probationary or Discontinuation

Normal Progress
Normal progress occurs when a student has passed each of the specified courses with a minimum grade point of 2 and has a CGPA of 2 or above.

 Probationary Progress
A student shall be on probation:

  • when she/he fails a compulsory course or
  • if his/her GPA or CGPA is less than two (2.0)

When the grade Point Average of a student goes up to 2.0 or above and the
student has passed all the compulsory courses in the following semester,      then the probation is removed.  The probationary status serves as a warning to students that their performance is below the level required

Discontinuation
That a student is discontinued when she/he has received three consecutive probations based on CGPA of the same core courses.

 Withdraw from a Program Course
A registered student may choose to withdraw from a program/course(s) for various reasons.

Retaking of a course
A failed course will be taken when it is next offered.

Certificate of due performance
A student shall be responsible for keeping a record of her/his practical experience in a log record book, which should be duly signed by the student, practical supervisor and course lecturer; for presentation to the Head of Department, before a certificate of due performance can be issued.  Attendance of classroom, clinical and fieldwork shall constitute 10% of the Progressive mark.  A candidate will be denied a Certificate of Due Performance in any course, if attendance and performance in class, clinical and practical are deemed unsatisfactory.

Degree Awards
The Award shall be called Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences. The degree shall be awarded with classification according to the University guidelines. Performance in individual courses shall be graded according to the approved semester system grading.  The Degree will show the students’ specialisation in any one of the following subjects: physiology, anatomy, microbiology, pathology, haematology, molecular science, clinical chemistry and pharmacology.

Programme Structure

Duration
This is a three-year academic programme.  Every academic year shall have two 17-week semesters and one 10-week recess term except in the third year, which will have no recess semester. The program has compulsory core courses in the first and second years with a choice of elective courses in the second semester of the third year. 

Curriculum implementation structure
This depicts allocation of time to various curricula activities. The activities and their symbols are shown below:

  • Clinical Sessions are shown as Cl.H (Clinical hours)
  • Laboratory sessions are shown as Lb.H (laboratory hours)
  • Overview lectures and seminars are shown as LH (lecture hours)
  • Skills laboratory activities, Practicals and Clinical Exposure are shown as PH (practical hours)
  • Tutorials sessions are shown as TH (tutorial hours)
  • Self directed learning is shown as SH (self-study hours)

1          Clinical /Laboratory hour        = 1 contact hour
1          Lecture hour    = 1 contact hour
2          Tutorial hours  = 1 contact hour
2          Practical hours             = 1 contact hour
2          Self study hours = 1 contact hour
1          Credit Unit      = 15 contact hours

Curriculum Map
Year 1
Block 1


Semester I

LH

Cl.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS   1111:Introduction to Biomedical Sciences, health professional education and Biomedical Ethics 

3

5

18

12

44

45

3

FOM 1112: Cells and Tissues

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

FOM 1113: Blood & Body Fluids

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

BBS1112: Introduction to Bioinformatics

2

6

12

8

24

30

2

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Block 2


Semester II

LH

Cl.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

FOM 1211:Cardiovascular & Respiratory            System

5

10

30

2

70

75

5

FOM 1212: Digestion, Nutrition & Metabolism

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

FOM 1213: Foundations of Behavioural Sciences

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Block 3


Recess Term

LH

Cl.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

FOM 1311: Introduction to Community Health I

2

12

24

32

36

60

4

FOM 1312:Introduction to Community Health II

2

12

24

32

36

60

4

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

Year 2
Block 1


Semester I

LH

Cl.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 2111:Endocrine, reproductive and Urinary system

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

BBS  2112: Head,  Neck and the Nuerolocomotor system

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

B BS 2113: Introduction Health policy and legislation

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

BBS 2114: Principles Health Economics

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

Block 2


Semester II

LH

Cl.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

FOM 2211:Principles of Microbiology             & Pathology

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

BBS 2212:General Pharmacology

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

BBS 2213: Infectious Diseases

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Block 3

Recess Term

LH

L.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS  2301: Laboratory management and safety and Material Science  

5

10

20

20

20

45

3

FOM 2312: Community Diagnosis and Communication

-

60

-

-

30

45

3

Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

Year 3
Block 1

Semester I

LH

Lb.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 3101         Research Proposal writing and Data management 

2

-

30

10

16

30

2

BBS 3102: Non –communicable diseases

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

BBS 3103: Reproductive health and Child survival

5

10

30

20

70

75

5

Select any 2 courses including medicine and gender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BBS 3103:      Medical anthropology

2

12

24

32

36

60

4

BBS 3104: Medical geography

2

12

24

32

36

60

4

BBS 3105: History of medicine

2

12

24

32

36

60

4

BBS 3106: Medicine and gender

2

12

24

32

36

60

4

Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

21

Option I:  Pharmacology

Semester II

LH

Lb.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 3201:  Chemotherapeutic agents and antimicrobial resistance

8

30

24

30

30

60

4

BBS 3202:  Drug development, registration, marketing and regulatory issues

10

30

30

30

40

75

5

  BBS 3203:  Toxicology, drug Abuse and drug safety issues         

3

15

20

15

30

45

3

BBS 3204:  Dissertation writing

3

15

30

20

60

45

3

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Option II : Microbiology

Semester II

LH

Lb.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 3205:  Applied bacteriology and parasitology

10

30

30

30

40

75

5

BBS 3206: Applied Mycology and Virology

6

20

18

20

20

45

3

BBS 3207. Routine diagnostic Techniques

8

30

24

30

30

60

4

BBS 3204 Dissertation writing

3

15

30

20

60

45

3

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Option III: Anatomy

Semester II

LH

L.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 3208 Embryology, Human development and Comparative anatomy

8

30

24

30

30

60

4

BBS 3209 Microscopic anatomy and histological techniques

10

30

30

30

40

75

5

       BBS 3210 Tissue preservation and embalming       

3

15

20

15

30

45

3

BBS 3204 Dissertation writing

3

15

30

20

60

45

3

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Option IV: Heamatology

Semester II

LH

L.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 3211:  Blood and Heamopoetic tissue disorders

8

30

24

30

30

60

4

BBS 3212:  Diagnostic approaches in haematology

10

30

30

30

40

75

5

BBS 3213: Transfusion and stem cell transplantation

3

15

20

15

30

45

3

BBS 3204 Dissertation writing

3

15

30

20

60

45

3

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Option VII: Histopathology

Semester II

LH

L.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 3214. Laboratory techniques in histopathology

8

30

24

30

30

60

4

BBS 3216       Autopsy and Mortuary Techniques

3

15

20

15

30

45

3

BBS 3215       Special Ancillary Diagnostic techniques in pathology

10

30

30

30

40

75

5

BBS 3204 Dissertation writing

3

15

30

20

60

45

3

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Option V: Molecular Biology

Semester II

LH

L.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 3217       Advanced concepts of cell biology and principles of microscopic analysis

4

15

30

20

60

75

5

BBS 3218       Principles of molecular biology

5

15

30

20

60

75

5

BBS 3219       Advanced molecular biology and biotechnology

2

6

12

8

24

30

2

BBS 3204 Dissertation writing

3

15

30

20

60

45

3

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Option VI: Physiology

Semester II

LH

L.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 3220       Application of  Radioimmunoassay and Imaging techniques

4

15

30

20

60

75

5

BBS 3221       Physiological Assessment of brain and Nueronal functions.

5

15

30

20

60

75

5

BBS 3222: Physiological assessment of body systems

2

6

12

8

24

30

2

BBS 3204 Dissertation writing

3

15

30

20

60

45

3

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Option IIX: Clinical Chemistry

Semester II

LH

L.H

TH

PH

SH

CH

CU

BBS 3223. Clinical chemistry Equipments and Instrumentation

8

30

24

30

30

60

4

BBS 3224       Clinical Biochemistry and disease processes

3

15

20

15

30

45

3

BBS 3225       Principles and applications of laboratory techniques

10

30

30

30

40

75

5

BBS 3204 Dissertation writing

3

15

30

20

60

45

3

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Year III:

BBS 3101       Research Proposal writing and Data management    
Course description
In this course the student will be helped to develop a project proposal on a subject of their choice in their area of specialisation.  This proposal will be presented to the department in the form of an oral exam.  Once passed the student will then be allowed to proceed to implement the proposal as a dissertation.

Teaching resources

Human resource
The program will be taught in the following departments; Pathology, Physiology, Anatomy, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Public Health , Paediatrics and Child health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology  and other Units of Mulago National referral Hospital. A detailed list of teaching staff on the proposed program is indicated in table 1 below.

Table 1:  Academic staff to teach on the program

Name

Title

Qualifications

Status

Current TL (hrs/wk)

Proposed TL(hrs/wk)

Dr. Dan Wamala

SC

MB.Ch.B, M.Med (Path). M.Med.Sc.(Cytopath)-

PT

10

12

Prof.Byarugaba

L

B.SC.M.MSc.PhD.

PT

2

4

Prof.Paul Waako

AP

M.B ChB,M.Sc.PhD

FT

10

12

Dr.P. Misaki

L

M.B.Ch.B, M.SC.

FT

8

10

Dr. Joseph Ochieng

L

M.B.Ch.B, M.Sc.(Anat.)

FT

10

12

Dr.Michael Odida

L

MB,Ch.B, M.Med.(Path)

FT

10

12

 Prof.Henry Wabinga

P

MB,Ch.B, M.Med.(Path)MD

FT

10

12

Dr.Lynette Tumwine

L

MB,Ch.B, M.Med.(Path

FT

8

12

Dr.Josephine Kasolo

SL

M.B.Ch.B, M.Sc.(Physio.)

PT

10

12

Dr.David Othieno

C

MB,Ch.B, M.Med.(Path

FT

6

8

Dr Andrew Okwi

T

BSc. M.SC.

FT

8

10

Mr.Oswalt

T

BLT, M.Sc.Lab magt

FT

10

12

Prof.Moses Joloba

AP

MB ChB, M.Sc., PhD

FT

10

12

Prof.Gabriel Bimenya

P

B.Sc, M.Sc. PhD

FT

8

10

Dr.Henry Kajjumbura

SL

MBCH.B.,M.Med(Micro.)

FT

8

12

Dr.Christine Najjuka

L

MBCH.B.,M.Med(Micro

FT

10

12

Dr. Fred Bwanga

L

MBChB,MMED ,PHD

FT

10

12

Dr.Achiles Katamba

L

MB.ChB, PHD

FT

10

12

Dr.Byamugisha

L

MB ChB, M.Med, PhD.

FT

10

12

Dr. Benon Asiimwe

l

BVM,MMED, PHD

FT

10

12

Prof. Kaddu Mulindwa

L

BVM,MSc, PhD

FT

10

12

Dr. Hakim Sendagire

L

MB ChB, M.Sc., PhD

FT

8

10

Dr, Okoth  Ndiira

L

MB,Ch.B, M.Med.

PT

10

12

Dr. Orach Garamoi

SL

MBchB MPH PhD

FT

8

10

Dr. Charles Ibingira

SL

MBchB Mmed

FT

6

10

Prof. Celestino Obua

AP

MD, MSc. PhD

FT

8

10

Dr. Peter Waiswa

L

MB ChB, M.Med, PhD.

FT

8

10

Prof. Jasper OgwalOkeng

P

M.B ChB,M.Sc.PhD

FT

8

10

Prof. G. Olobo

P

MB ChB, M.Med, PhD.

FT

8

10

Dr. David Makumbi

SL

BSc. MPH, PHD

FT

8

10

Dr. Joel Okullo

SL

MBChB MSc.

FT

8

10

Dr. Hawa Nalwoga

sl

MB ChB, M.Med, PhD.

FT

8

10

Dr.Nabadda

cons

MBchB Mmed

 

6

8

 


 L-lecturer, SL-Senior Lecturer, AP-Associate professor, P-Professor
SC-Senior Consultant , C-Consultant,  PT-Part time, FT-Full Time, TL-Teaching Load

Laboratory Equipments and specimens
Physical Facilities

  1. Pathology lecture theatre for lectures
  2. The cytology laboratory
  3. The Histopathology laboratory
  4. Davis Lecture theaters.
  5. Molecular pathology Laboratory
  6. Immunohistochemistry Laboratory.
  7. Mortuary lecture theatre.
  8. Hospital Pathology Laboratory.
  9. Microbiology Laboratory
  10. Immunoflorence Laboratory-Mulago Hospital
  11. Mortuary

How to Apply
Application forms are available at 5th floor Senate building or online at the School of Graduates Studies

Preamble
The Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (DTM&H) is an international post-graduate course organized and run by the London school of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), University of Washington, Makerere University College of Health Sci

How to Apply
Applications are invited from medical applicants from both industrialized and developing countries. Visit the LSHTM for application procedures.

2011 East African DTM&H Accreditation and Draft Curriculum v1

On February 9th the LSHTM Learning and Teaching Committee approved the first stage of a new DTM&H delivered wholly in East Africa.

Syllabus:  75% tropical infectious diseases
25%  general healthcare in Africa

Content:   75% core modules
25% student-selected modules

Form:        25%  expert seminars
25% direct clinical contact
25%  practical work including critical appraisal and teaching skills
25%  independent study

Bare bones structure

Tanzania            Week theme                                   Practical components

Week 1                Clinical epidemiology                      Clinical and teaching rounds
Week 2                Special topics in medicine  
Week 3                Malaria                                             Clinical and teaching rounds
Week 4                Rural placement                              4 pairs of groups
Week 5                Parasitology                                     Clinical and teaching rounds
Week 6                Dermatology                         

Break                   Wednesday afternoon 26th to Monday 31st October inclusive

Week 7                Paediatric assessment                  Nairobi (in transit)

Uganda              Week theme                         Practical components

Week 8                HIV & TB                                Clinical and teaching rounds
Week 9                HIV & TB                                Clinical and teaching rounds
Week 10              Population health                  Clinical and teaching rounds
Week 11              Options 1                                4 pairs of groups
Week 12              Options 2                                4 pairs of groups
Week 13              Revision                                 Examination and award ceremony

Notes

Rural placement

  • Groups of 5 students dispersed to district hospitals and community centres throughout Tanzania
  • One week placement
  • Tutor with local knowledge split between two adjacent groups
  • Preceded by long weekend for travel and sightseeing

Suggestions include

  • 4 coastal groups
  • 2 lake groups
  • 2 inland groups

Options 1 & 2

  • Modules last for one week and are repeated in the second week (so responsibility is for 2 wks)
  • 4 – 6 students per group
  • Led by a specialist tutor
  • Focus on experiential learning
  • Preceded by long weekend for travel and sightseeing

Lots of possibilities based on existing expertise and staff on the ground; suggestions so far include

  • Cancer and palliative care
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Helminth infections and nutrition
  • Leprosy and leishmaniasis
  • Maternal and perinatal health
  • Mental health and substance misuse
  • Refugee and migrant health
  • Schistosomiasis control
  • Trypanosomiasis control

Devolution of responsibilities

Oversight and coordination of curriculum development: Course Director

25 module-leads required

7 main group themes
6 main group clinical and teaching rounds
4 rural placement pairs
8 small group options run for 2 weeks

Northern allocations suggested at Seattle Summit

London 2/3         = 16 modules
Hopkins 1/6        = 4 modules
Seattle 1/6          = 4 modules


module no

week no

country

arrival

departure

main curriculum theme

module lead

institution

allocation

M1

week 1

Tanzania

18-Sep

24-Sep

Clinical Epidemiology

Alison Grant

LSHTM

L1

M2

week 1

Tanzania

18-Sep

24-Sep

Bedside teaching and training to teach

Cordelia Coltart

LSHTM

L2

M3

week 2

Tanzania

25-Sep

1-Oct

Special Topics in Medicine

David Mabey

LSHTM

L3

M4

week 2

Tanzania

25-Sep

1-Oct

Bedside teaching and training to teach

Doug Parkin

LSHTM

L4

M5

week 3

Tanzania

2-Oct

8-Oct

Malaria

Baz Nadjm

LSHTM

L5

M6

week 3

Tanzania

2-Oct

8-Oct

Bedside teaching and training to teach

Tom Doherty

LSHTM

L6

M7

week 4

Tanzania

7-Oct

17-Oct

Rural placement 1&2

Fiona Cresswell

NWPH

L7

M8

week 4

Tanzania

7-Oct

17-Oct

Rural placement 3&4

Baz Nadjm

LSHTM

L8

M9

week 4

Tanzania

7-Oct

17-Oct

Rural placements 5&6

Anthony Solomon

LSHTM

L9

M10

week 4

Tanzania

7-Oct

17-Oct

Rural placements 7&8

Debby Watson-Jones

LSHTM

L10

M11

week 4

Tanzania

7-Oct

17-Oct

Rural placements 9&10

 ?

JHU

JHU1

M12

week 5

Tanzania

16-Oct

22-Oct

Parasitology Lab

Steve Morris-Jones

LSHTM

L11

M13

week 5

Tanzania

16-Oct

22-Oct

Clinical tropical medicine

Paul Pottinger?

UW

UW1

M14

week 6

Tanzania

23-Oct

26-Oct

Dermatology

Rachael Morris-Jones

Kings

L12

M15

week 7

Kenya

1-Nov

5-Nov

Paediatric simulation training

Natalie Prevatt

KEMRI

KEMRI

M16

week 8

Uganda

6-Nov

12-Nov

TB

Moses Joloba/Yuka Manabe

MUJHU

JHU2

M17

week 8

Uganda

6-Nov

12-Nov

Bedside teaching and training to teach

Robin McKensie/Moses Kamya

MUJHU

JHU3

M18

week 9

Uganda

13-Nov

18-Nov

HIV

Alex Coutinho/Steve Reynolds

MUJHU

JHU4

M19

week 9

Uganda

13-Nov

18-Nov

Bedside teaching and training to teach

David Roesel?

UW

UW2

M20

week 10

Uganda

18-Nov

28-Nov

SSM 1 Trypanosomaisis & Schistosomiasis

Stephen Wright

LSHTM

L13

M21

week 10

Uganda

18-Nov

28-Nov

SSM 2 Leprosy & Leishmaniasis

Steve Walker

LSHTM

L14

M22

week 10

Uganda

18-Nov

28-Nov

SSM 3 Refugee Health & Nutrition

David Roesel?

UW

UW3

M23

week 10

Uganda

18-Nov

28-Nov

SSM 4 VHF & Outbreak Control

Steve Cose

LSHTM

L15

M24

week 10

Uganda

18-Nov

28-Nov

SSM5 Maternal Child and Reproductive Health

MaryGlenn Fowler/Philippa Musuke

MUJHU

JHU5

M25

week 11

Uganda

27-Nov

3-Dec

SSM 6 Non Communicable Diseases

Gavin Dreyer

UMCM

L16

M26

week 11

Uganda

27-Nov

3-Dec

SSM 7 Emergency Trauma and Surgery

Moses Joloba

MUJHU

JHU6

M27

week 11

Uganda

27-Nov

3-Dec

SSM 8 Traveler's Health & Disaster Medicine

Chris Sanford?

UW

UW4

M28

week 11

Uganda

27-Nov

3-Dec

SSM 9 Cancer & Palliative Care

Corey Casper??

UW

UW5

M29

week 11

Uganda

27-Nov

3-Dec

SSM 10 Humanitarian Medicine & Mental Health

Alexander van Tulleken

UCL

L17

M30

week 12

Uganda

4-Dec

10-Dec

Zoonotic Infections

Moses Joloba/Noreen Hynes

MUJHU

UW6

M31

week 12

Uganda

4-Dec

10-Dec

Special Topics in Medicine

Chi Eziefula

LSHTM

L18

 

 

 

 


 

Preamble

In Uganda, as in many sub-Saharan African countries, communicable diseases contribute more than 60% of the disease burden. To date, the most effective means of infectious disease control remains immunization of pre-exposed individuals as well as early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The MSc in Immunology and Clinical Microbiology will run alongside the existing three-year Master of Medicine in Microbiology, which is offered to medical applicants. The program will last 2 years, and is designed to fill the gap for immunologists and clinical microbiologists in Uganda and the region through opening graduate training to non-medical applicants. This will alleviate the shortage of well-trained immunologists, clinical microbiologists and a strong research force in the country. The program will heavily rely on outcomes from contemporary research and their clinical applications, which are increasingly being introduced in Uganda.

JUSTIFICATION & RATIONALE
Over the past decade, immunology has transformed into a wide discipline that continues to play a leading role in human medicine, from vaccine and drug discovery to general patient care. The advances in medicine-organ transplants (liver, kidney, heart…) have tremendously increased worldwide. Uganda is building capacity to carry out its own transplant services as well as manage transplant patients from other countries. To be effective in managing transplant patients, competent immunologists are needed to assess organ compatibility as well as help in guiding the immunosuppressive therapy. Thus, the Master of Science in Immunology and Clinical Microbiology program will fill the gap for highly skilled immunologists in Uganda, through opening graduate training in this discipline to outstanding non-medical applicants. Furthermore, to improve patient care, the world Health Organization is emphasizing development of Point-of-Care (POC) tests that would rapidly diagnose diseases at the initial contact at a health care facility, thus limiting transmission. So far, most of the POC tests for infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and syphilis have an immunological basis, and their interpretation requires a sound understanding of Immunology/microbiology. This can be achieved through advanced training in immunology and clinical microbiology, which the proposed program aims to do. For resource limited countries, the need for graduate training in immunology cannot be overemphasized.

Moreover, the Ministry of Health in Uganda (USSP) and the World Health Organization (WHO) strongly advocate that the National, regional, district and Health Centre IV hospitals have a theater and at least one clinical microbiologist/immunologist. There are over 300 Hospitals in Uganda, and none of these has a clinical microbiologist/immunologist. The consequences of delayed or missed diagnosis include death, increased disease transmission, disabilities, social and economic losses. Highly qualified clinical laboratory scientists are needed to combat diseases and advance the field.

Program objectives

The program aims at achieving the following objectives:

  • To extend post-graduate training in immunology and clinical microbiology at Makerere University to non-medical applicants, as it occurs internationally, providing an international program that can serve local, regional and international needs
  • To produce skilled manpower for the management of an increasing number of patients with compromised immunity, as in “Tissue/Organ” transplants, Cancer and immunodeficiencies
  • To produce graduates who can guide patient care and the public on the pathology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestation, mode of transmission and prevention of infections of clinical and public health importance
  • To produce skilled manpower for the emerging pharmaceutical and medical industry that is developing medical diagnostics, drugs and vaccines locally. The graduates will invaluable in the local development of new medical diagnostics, drugs or vaccines
  • To prepare outstanding students for the pursuit of a doctoral  degree in immunology that is currently running at the College of Health sciences
  • To produce graduates who can critique and evaluate the impact of the existing national disease control programs and advise on improving them
  • To produce graduates with capacity to manage and guide appropriately equipped and staffed clinical microbiology laboratories
  • To produce teachers for medical microbiology and immunology in Ugandan medical universities

Skills learning outcomes

Upon completion of the program, graduates will:

  • Be able to interpret or guide the development of medical diagnostics in need locally and cheaply
  • Be able to manage and guide appropriately equipped and staffed clinical microbiology laboratories
  • Be a highly skilled human resource for the emerging pharmaceutical/medical industry
  • Be able to participate in supervised or team-research in universities, industry or government
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge in the fields of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, with excellent skills to teach and communicate this knowledge
  • Demonstrate independent critical and analytical thinking, both within their field of study, and beyond, for the use of their knowledge for service to others.
  • Be able to guide patient care and the public on the pathology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestation, mode of transmission, prevention and current control methods for infections of public health importance
  • Be a highly skilled human resource in the management of an increasing number of patients with tissue/Organ transplants, Cancers and immunodefficiencies, all of whom have increased in Uganda and need careful monitoring by specialists
  • Be able to critique and evaluate the impact of the existing national disease control programs on the epidemiology of infectious diseases and advise on improving them
  • Have acquired critical and analytical skills required for further studies in specialized areas of immunological or related studies
  • Identify and suggest possible solutions to ethical dilemmas that occur in their work and field of study, and understand the importance of professional ethics in all aspects of scientific communication and laboratory work
  • Demonstrate competence in the laboratory, including application of the scientific method and appropriate use of basic and state of the art laboratory tools and techniques
  • Demonstrate written and oral skills necessary for communication of research, knowledge, and ideas to scientists and non-scientists alike

OTHER COMPETENCES THAT WILL BE ACQUIRED

Additionally, students will:

  • Have acquired ‘Self-Directed Learning skills, competent at Scientific Literature Search and Writing, presentation and communication skills
  • Be able to apply modern laboratory immunology and clinical microbiology techniques to a variety of scientific disciplines
  • Have understood how abnormal immune responses underlie medical disorders
  • Be able to relate basic processes by which the immune system works and how it may go wrong in disease
  • Be able to evaluate the impact of the existing disease control programs on epidemiology of infectious diseases
  • Given the relevant clinical data, the student should be able to choose the appropriate test procedures for evaluation of patient status
  • Given specific test results, the student should be able to determine the patients' clinical condition and correlate the results with results from the microbiology, hematology and chemistry laboratories
  • Be able to describe molecular diagnostic tests that can be used to diagnose and manage human diseases
  • Be able to describe the specimen collection, transport, processing and storage requirements and fundamental principle of the procedures utilized to carry out DNA-based technologies including
  • Describe the acceptable workflow and proper design of molecular diagnostic laboratories
  • Describe appropriate Quality Control and Assurance and describe regulatory requirements for organizations that may in future oversee the establishment of molecular diagnostic laboratories
  • List the major clinical/medical uses of molecular diagnostic kits
  • Able to identify appropriate specimen collection and handling measures for molecular diagnostics

EMPLOYEMENT

Upon completion, graduates may serve in the following areas: 

  • Career in Research and Teaching

Uganda currently has five national Universities and three private ones, which train Medical doctors, Pharmacists, Nurses and other health workers. The demand for immunologists and microbiologists to engage in this training is enormous.

  • Hospitals

For better patient care, the Ministry of Health’s recommendation is to have at least one microbiologist per hospital. Uganda has about 300 hospitals without clinically trained microbiologist in almost all of them. Clinical microbiologists are needed to advance patient care.

  • Entrepreneurship

In the medical profession, Diagnostic immunology and Molecular Diagnostics are currently among the most commercialized services with a large clientele. Ugandan patients get these services from other countries (mostly South Africa) and the cost is high. Graduates of this program with entrepreneurship skills may venture into this lucrative service. 

  • Medical research institutions and None Governmental Organizations need specialists in immunology and clinical microbiology to perform and advance their activities
  • Commercial medical laboratories, tissue/Organ transplant institutes and international hospitals that are emerging will require microbiologists for their advancement.

Target Group
The program seeks to recruit:

  • District Medical Officers and Health workers who wish to specialize in infectious diseases
  • Research assistants and laboratory personnel in research and hospital laboratories
  • Pharmacists, Pharmacologists, Chemists and other Scientists in the private sector
  • Anyone with a scientific background who would wish for career change to immunology and infectious diseases

Duration
The Msc in Immunology and Clinical Microbiology will be for a minimum of 2 years (4 semesters and one recess term) and a maximum of three years (6 semesters and one recess term). Each semester shall consist of 17 weeks, 15 for study and 2 for examination. The recess term will consist of 10 weeks, the last 2 being for examination. All courses offered are core to the curriculum and students are expected to take all of them.

Admission requirements
The general admission requirements of Makerere University will apply where appropriate. The following specific criteria will apply:

  • To be eligible for admission into this program, the candidate must hold a Bachelor’s Degree in Biological Sciences or a degree in Pharmacy, Dentistry, Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Nursing or Environmental health sciences or their equivalent, with a GPA of no less 3.5
  • However, in some cases, admission may be flexible to allow those with GPA below 3.5, provided they have acquired specialized skills such as research experience evidenced by publications

Mode of Delivery
Most courses in the program will be coordinated and taught by leading scholars and faculty in Uganda.

The mode of teaching for this program will be as follows:

  • Keynote Lectures from subject matter specialists
  • Self Directed Learning through student mini-teaching sessions that will consist of in-depth discussions of topics briefly covered by preceding keynote lectures. The topics will be approved by the lecturer and the lecturer will attend.
  • Clinical scenarios (Hospital Ward rounds): case presentation, relations of signs and symptoms to the disease process and pathogenesis
  • Guided student presentations of selected scientific papers
  • Practicals: Most modules are predominantly practically based with “hands-on” experience

Examination Regulations
The regulations for Makerere University examinations will be followed

Award of Degree
The degree Masters of Science in Immunology and Clinical Microbiology of Makerere University will be awarded
Laboratory Rotations
Students will complete a one week laboratory rotations in the Departmental labs and other selected labs in the College and Mulago hospital complex, for exposure to the different lab set ups and research projects by faculty. Students will be evaluated and graded on each rotation by the supervising faculty. The dissertation laboratory will then be chosen from one of the rotation labs, although this will not always be required in that students will have freedom to perform their research elsewhere.
Schedule for laboratory rotations:

  • Day1: The Clinical Microbiology Labs: lay out and instrumentation
  • Day2: The BSL3 Mycobacteriology Laboratory: Lay out and Instrumentation
  • Day3: The Molecular Biology/Diagnostic Laboratory: lay out and instrumentation
  • Day4: The Immunology laboratory: Lay out and Instrumentation
  • Day5: The MUJHU Core Laboratories
  • Day6: MUWRP Laboratories

Laboratory coordinator
A Laboratory Education coordinator will be a member of staff of the Department, whose main responsibilities shall be to:
i) Supervise students at the various attachment sites                                                                                                 
ii) Plan, organize and manage laboratory oriented activities of the program

Program coordinator
The program coordinator shall be responsible for:
i) The day-to-day management of the program by liaison with the year and course leaders
ii) Liaison with Laboratory attachment sites and student representatives
iii) Ensuring that the students' records are appropriately maintained
iii) Ensuring that the required data is collected for inclusion in the annual report of the Head of Department
iv) Liaison with other participating departments
v)  Ensuring availability of the required resources at the various attachment sites

Field Attachments
The program will be based at the College of Health Sciences and will benefit from the facilities of the Department and College at large. For now we do not envisage any field attachments but they will be considered as need arises.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

Year 1, Semester 1

Semester I

Code

Course Name

CU

LH

PH

CH

New/Current

 

Core Course

 

CEB 7101

Epidemiology & Biostatistics

 

4

 

30

 

40

 

60

Current

 

Core Course

 

MIM 7101

Fundamentals of Immunology  

 

3

 

10

 

35

 

45

New

 

Core Course

 

MIM 7102

Regulation of the Immune Response

 

4

 

30

 

40

 

60

New

Core Course

MIM 7103

Molecular Immunology

4

30

40

60

New

Year 1, Semester 2

Semester II

Code

Course Name

CU

LH

PH

CH

New/Current

 

Core Course

 

MCM 8101

 

Clinical Microbiology I & II

 

4

 

30

 

40

 

60

Current

Core Course

MIM 7201

Clinical Immunology

4

30

40

60

New

Core Course

MIM 7202

Diagnostic Immunology

4

30

40

60

New

Core Course

MIM 7203

Molecular Diagnostics

4

30

40

60

New

Year 1, Recess Term

Semester II

Code

Course Name

CU

LH

PH

CH

New/Current

 

Core Course

 

HSM 7301

Health Systems Management & Research

 

2

 

10

 

25

 

30

Current

 

Core Course

 

MIM 7301

 

Ethics in Clinical Research

 

4

 

30

 

40

 

60

New

Core course

MIM 7302

Seminar/Journal club

3

10

35

45

Current

           
Year 2


Semester I & II

Code

Course Name

CU

LH

PH

CH

New/Current

Core Course

MIM 7401

Research & Dissertation

30

 

900

225

New

Certificate of due performance
In order to sit for the end of semester examination, a candidate must have a certificate of due performance.

Assessment and Examination
Each candidate will be assessed continuously based on scores from tutorials, seminars, practical and mid- semester written and practical examinations. End of semester examinations will consist of Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs), short answer questions and long answer questions, a practical examination and viva- voce.  Continuous assessment shall carry 40% of the final mark while Semester examinations will carry 60%.

Grading courses

Each course shall be graded out of a maximum of 100 marks and assigned appropriate letter grades and grade point average as follows:

Marks

Latter Grade

Grade point

Interpretation

90-100

A+

5

Exceptional

80-89

A

5

Excellent

75-79

B+

4.5

Very Good

70-74

B

4

Good

65-69

C+

3.5

Fairly Good

60-64

C

3

Pass

55-59

D

2.5

Marginal Fail

50-54

D-

2

Clear Fail

45-49

E

1.5

Bad Fail

40-44

E

1

Qualified Fail

Below 40

F

0

Qualified Fail

The minimum course grade pass will be 3.0

Student progress will be measured as follows:

Normal progress
To progress on normal progress from semester to semester and from one year to another, a candidate must score an average of 60% or more in each of the courses he/she registered for and a GPA of 3.0 and above at the end of each semester examinations.

Probationary progress
A candidate who fails any of the offered courses in a semester shall be put on probation. A student who obtains a GPA of less than 3.0 in a semester or has a GPA of less than 3.0 in a course shall be placed on probation. 

Re-taking the course
A student who fails any of the offered courses in a semester will retake the course and examinations when the course is next offered. A student may retake a course to improve the grade if the first pass grade was low.

Discontinuation
A student will be discontinued when he/she has received three consecutive probations based on GPA. Such a student would have failed to obtain at least a pass mark of 60% during the third assessment in the same course or courses.

Research and Dissertation
This will be done in the second year of study (for each student) upon successful completion of the coursework. The students are encouraged to choose an appropriate supervisor (who is a member of the academic staff of the University) and a Research project. Prior to commencing their research, students will present their research proposals before faculty for approval. The research project may be clinical or laboratory based or both, and the student will spend at least three days per week in the laboratory, with the remainder of their time spent either in the laboratory or in private study as agreed with their supervisors. Note that the research will not be carried out until approved by the Departmental and college higher degrees committee, and if involving human subjects, Institution review board (IRB) as well as the National Council of Science and Technology permission will have to be sought. The project will run for a maximum of seven months, with the final two months allocated to writing. The student will meet with their supervisors frequently as needed to discuss progress.

Members of the School of biomedical sciences and other schools within the college and the University may offer to supervise student research projects in any area of research. Students can then choose from these projects, which they could have identified through the laboratory rotations. The research projects will be fulltime and done over a period of not more nine months, with written dissertation that includes a critical literature review, research methodology, results and discussion of these results in relation to other published work in the field. The dissertation will be presented to the school of graduate studies for examination, at least one month before the end of the second semester of the final year. Download the SGS guidelines for dissertation writing.

The dissertation will be graded as: -

  • Scientific content and presentation accepted – passed
  • Scientific content and presentation accepted but minor corrections needed in presentation
  • Scientific content accepted but needs major corrections in presentation and Interpretation of data
  • Scientific content not accepted – failed

Resubmission of dissertation is to be done within 6 months. Only one resubmission is allowed

Award of Degree
The degree Masters of Science in Immunology and Clinical Microbiology of Makerere University will be awarded without classification

RESOURCES AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Library
Sir Albert Cook Library of the College of Health Sciences is well equipped and contains current editions of text books of immunology and clinical microbiology which are available to students. The library has access to databases for leading journals and electronic books in immunology and clinical microbiology.  Graduate students are also provided passwords to access medical literature electronically using the WHO/HINARI initiative (World Health Organization/Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative).

Lecture Space
The Department has nine spacious office laboratories, one of which is being used as a computer room for post-graduate students. There are also two study rooms reserved for MSc and PhD postgraduate students. The department has a big teaching laboratory, accommodating up to 500 students.

Computers
The Department has a computer laboratory (6 x 8 meters) for post-graduate students, equipped with 5 desktop computers, each fully connected to internet and routinely serviced.

Research Laboratories
Immunology
The Immunology laboratory was established in the department through collaboration with the Makerere University College of Health Sciences and the, Uganda Virus Research Instituteto build capacity for immunology in the university. This is the first and only fully fledged teaching immunology laboratory in the University. The laboratory also collaborates with the Makerere University Walter Reed, Medical Research Council and Join Clinical Research Centre Laboratories. The laboratory can perform and teach all T-cell and immunoglobulin based immunological techniques.

Equipment available in the immunology laboratory
Water baths, Centrifuges, ELISA machines; Refrigerators and freezers; Liquid nitrogen tanks; P2 and P3 safety cabinets; CO2 incubators; Spectrophotometers; and minor equipment such as pipette aides, Vacuum systems

Personnel
The department is working with five dedicated immunologists and many visiting immunologists from the Uganda Virus Research Institute with keen interest in developing the new program.

Doctoral program
The department has gone ahead and started a doctoral program in immunology with five fully sponsored PhD immunology students. These will be very instrumental in running the masters program. The doctoral program will also serve as an avenue for the masters graduates. Although it is new, the doctoral program has been very favorably reviewed by Welcome Trust, Karolinska institute and Case Western Reserve Universities that are well recognized immunology teaching institutions.

Clinical Microbiology laboratories

Molecular Biology and Diagnostics labs
This laboratory started in 2003 with a mandate to introduced molecular techniques to control of infections in Uganda. The laboratory is well staffed and fully equipped to handle bothe basic and applied techniques in molecular biology, ranging from DNA extraction to gene deletion.

Personnel
The program shall be taught by the faculty in the Department of Medical Microbiology in collaboration with other relevant Departments of the University e.g. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, department of Pathology and Specialists from other institutions from within and outside Uganda. Notably, subject matter specialists from the Uganda Virus Research Institute, who are also honorary lectures and professors at MakCHS, will be heavily involved in running the program.

Key Personnel:

  1. Dr Katongole Mbidde, MBChB, PhD
  2. Dr Ponsiano Kaleebu, MBChB, PhD
  3. Dr Josephine Birungi, MBChB, PhD
  4. Dr Steve Cose, PhD
  5. Dr Julius Lutwama, PhD
  6. Dr Jonathan Kayondo, PhD
  7. Dr Agwu Ezra, PhD
  8. Dr Jackson Oryem, MBChB, PhD
  9. Dr Olaho Mukhani, BVM, PhD
  10. Prof. J. Olobo - BVM, M.Sc., Ph.D.
  11. Prof. Harriet Mayanja, MBChB, MMED, MSC
  12. Assoc. Prof. D. Kaddu-Mulindwa, - BVM, MSc.  Ph.D
  13. Assoc. Prof. Fred Kironde-Ph.D
  14. Assoc. Prof. Paul Waako-PHD
  15. Assoc. Prof. Celistino Obua-Ph.D
  16. Assoc. Prof.  Henry Wabinga-Ph.D
  17. Prof. Charles Karamaji, PhD
  18. Prof. Moses Kamya, PhD
  19. Dr. Oloho Mukani, PhD
  20. Dr. Steve Cosey, PhD
  21. Dr. Alison Elliott, PhD
  22. Dr. F. C. Najjuka - MB.Ch.B, M.Sc. M.Med
  23. Dr. H. Kajumbula - MB, Ch.B. M.Med
  24. Dr. M. Joloba - MB.Ch.B, M.Sc, Ph.D
  25. Dr. David P Kateete – BVM, Msc
  26. Dr. Benon B Asiimwe – BVM,M.sc, PhD
  27. Dr. Bwanga Fred – MB.Ch.B, M.Med, PhD
  28. Dr. Sentongo Elizabeth – MB.Ch.B, PhD
  29. Dr. Hakim Sendagire – MB.Ch.B , M.Sc, PhD
  30. Mr. Samuel Nsobya-MLT, BLT, MSc, PhD
  31. Dr. Micheal Odida- MB.Ch.B, M.Med, PhD
  32. Dr. Jackson Orem- MB.Ch.B, M.Med
  33. Dr. Dan Wamala- MB.Ch.B, M.Med
  34. Dr Lynette Tumwine, MB.Ch.B, M.Med, PhD
  35. Dr Hawa Nalwoga, MB.Ch.B, M.Med, PhD
  36. Dr Galukande, MB.Ch.B, M.Med
  37. Mr. M. Waiswa - Principal Laboratory technician, MSc
  38. Mr. A. Ssevviri-Kaddu - Senior Laboratory technician
  39. Mr. Baluku Hanington – Laboratory Technician
  40. Mr. Odongo Paul – Laboratory Technician
  41. Mr. Robert Ebwongu – Laboratory Assistant

How to Apply
Application forms are available at 5th floor Senate building or online from the website for the School of Graduates Studies